Where to Place “Bishop’s Honor” While The Cold Bites Off Humanity

“Bishop’s Honor” tells the story of Bishop, a detached soldier who formerly lived in solitary, far from the rest of the humanity. Then came Maeve, his former best friend’s widow, and her six-year-old son. Due to his promise to Maeve’s husband, Bishop came out from his isolation in order to help Maeve and her son navigated themselves through the Maunder Minimum, a period of solar inactivity that led to a mini-ice age.

“Bishop’s Honor” tells the story of Bishop, a detached soldier who formerly lived in solitary, far from the rest of the humanity. Then came Maeve, his former best friend’s widow, and her six-year-old son. Due to his promise to Maeve’s husband, Bishop came out from his isolation in order to help Maeve and her son navigated themselves through the Maunder Minimum, a period of solar inactivity that led to a mini-ice age.

Continue reading “Where to Place “Bishop’s Honor” While The Cold Bites Off Humanity”

Gender Identity Crisis, Stuck in the History, and Endangered by Royal Families’ Schemes: What’s So Interesting About Korean Drama “Mr. Queen”

Blue House chef Jang Bong-hwan’s arrogant attitude invites hostile intention from other people around him. They then come up with a plan which results in Bong-hwan’s coma after a police chase. When he wakes up though, he finds himself in a chamber of a Joseon Dynasty’s crown princess, Kim So-young (later known as Queen Cheorin). Now, not only puzzled by his changing sex and historical events surrounding him, Bong-hwan also faces the danger of opposite clan who wants him (her) to let go of his (hm, her) status as crown princess and soon-to-be-queen of Joseon Dynasty.

Blue House chef, Jang Bong-hwan, believes that there is no one more powerful than him in Korea. After all, he is the one who decides what food will be consumed by important political members of South Korea. His arrogant attitude invites hostile intention from other people around him. They then come up with a plan which results in Bong-hwan’s coma after a police chase.

When he wakes up though, instead of in a hospital, he finds himself in a chamber of a Joseon Dynasty’s crown princess, Kim So-young (later known as Queen Cheorin) from the Kim Clan. Now, not only puzzled by his changing sex and historical events surrounding him, Bong-hwan also faces the danger of opposite clan who wants him (her) to let go of his (hm, her) status as crown princess and soon-to-be-queen of Joseon Dynasty. As the icing on the cake, it seems that her own fiance, King Cheoljong, does not hold any affection for her and instead wants her dead.

Continue reading “Gender Identity Crisis, Stuck in the History, and Endangered by Royal Families’ Schemes: What’s So Interesting About Korean Drama “Mr. Queen””

Cinderella II: Dreams Come True–When Your True Self Is More Magical Than True Fantasy

After years of being a girl covered in ashes and dust, Cinderella has found her true happy ending. Coming home from her honeymoon, she is greeted by her first task as a princess: to hold the palace’s beloved banquet. Not only she has to handle the ballroom’s decoration, the foods, the guests list, and the music, she also has to learn how to act like a proper princess.

After years of being a girl covered in ashes and dust, Cinderella has found her true happy ending. Coming home from her honeymoon, she is greeted by her first task as a princess: to hold the palace’s beloved banquet. Not only she has to handle the ballroom’s decoration, the foods, the guests list, and the music, she also has to learn how to act like a proper princess.

Well, how hard can it be?

Cinderella II: Dreams Come True is a story collection of Cinderella’s life after her marriage to the Prince Charming (note: does he really not have a name?). Released in February 2000, Cinderella II: Dreams Come True offers uncomplicated storyline, a sprinkle of magic, and a lesson (or maybe more) about how to accept yourself as you already are.

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Avengers: End Game – Dealing with Choices and How It Affects the Future

I jumped to Avengers: End Game without watching the previous movies, or even taking a peek on their synopsis. So basically, I was clueless. I could vaguely pinpoint who each character is based on what I’ve heard from the snippets of my friends’ conversation, but I didn’t know what strength they have or what kind of past they’ve been through before they finally assemble as the Avengers. Hell, I didn’t even know what causes them to become the Avengers in the first place. I still don’t, to be honest.

The only superhero movies I’ve watched (and remember the plots) can be counted with one hand. Okay, maybe even with one finger. For sure, I’ll forget about that particular movie soon enough. So, before I also forget about how this movie came to be, I’m going to write about it first.

I jumped to Avengers: End Game without watching the previous movies, or even taking a peek on their synopsis. So basically, I was clueless. I could vaguely pinpoint who each character is based on what I’ve heard from the snippets of my friends’ conversation, but I didn’t know what strength they have or what kind of past they’ve been through before they finally assemble as the Avengers. Hell, I didn’t even know what causes them to become the Avengers in the first place. I still don’t, to be honest.

Continue reading “Avengers: End Game – Dealing with Choices and How It Affects the Future”

Jennifer Blackstream’s “Deadline”: A Blend of Magic and Crime

Shade Renards has decades and a dark past behind her, but right now she’s just a village witch. And she doesn’t want to be. Her biggest dream is to be a detective, helping people uncovering crimes instead of helping people with their backache or pets that get sick. Despite her mentor’s explicit disapproval, Shade opens up a new investigation agency. Her first case is a missing—possibly dead—person. But she finds more than just a dead body.

Shade Renards has decades and a dark past behind her, but right now she’s just a village witch. And she doesn’t want to be. Her biggest dream is to be a detective, helping people uncovering crimes instead of helping people with their backache or pets that get sick. Despite her mentor’s explicit disapproval, Shade opens up a new investigation agency. Her first case is a missing—possibly dead—person. But she finds more than just a dead body.

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Illustrated Journaling Challenge Day #10 – Mizu ni Sumu Hana, A Review

Image source: Mizu ni Sumu Hana Manga Cover Volume 2.

20/01/2021 – Listening to TWICE’s Sweet Summer Day.

Recently I finished Mizu ni Sumu Hana (水に棲む花; Flowers That Live in Water; alternative title: Romance of Darkness) manga series. It was written by Shinohara Chie and published from 2004 to 2005. The series itself consists of five manga volumes (24 chapters).

The story revolves around a high school girl named Nikaidou Rikka. One day, the school bus she was on plunged into a lake and everyone inside died, except for her. She was miraculously saved by a water god called Izumi. For years, Izumi had been interested in girls named Rikka though he couldn’t remember why. Another Rikka was previously also saved by Izumi using a seed that could prolong her life. If she didn’t get the seed, she would die soon. On the other hand, by swallowing the seed Izumi had given her, Nikaidou Rikka was on the process of assimilating with water. That gave her two option: to live with Izumi in water and leave Yuzuru (the guy she loved) behind or to give up the seed and die so that another Rikka could live?

Personally I think the story’s plot is a bit cliche. I don’t enjoy much of the characters, except for the other Rikka (who seemed to be the only character showing personality development in the entire series). There was a lot of talks about sacrifice and destiny, which were supposed to be romantic, but ended up as being too forced and, honestly, kind of unnecessary. On the other hand, the art was really good and I love how the author incorporated all water scenes into the story. I also appreciate that even though the initial premise was a love triangle, it actually didn’t quite evolve to be so. On that mark, the series wasn’t as predictable as I expected it to be.

I recommend this for a light read when you have spare time and want something quick to enjoy. Also good for fantasy and supernatural lover who doesn’t want to dive deep into another universe but still crave some magical moments.